Tag Archives: Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

History and Development The Staffordshire Bull Terrier, as his name implies, was produced from a Bulldog with one or more of the terrier breeds which abounded in the early 1800’s. His main progenitor was the Old English Bulldog of about 1820, when the initial crossings were made. This was a rangier, lighter Bulldog than our modem version – in fact, sonic students of canine racism aver that the Stafford is actually a fined-down type of pure Bulldog, selectively bred on terrier-like lines with no true terrier infusion. Quite apart from the name “Bull-and-Terrier” used freely in literature for many decades, respected authors like Pierce Egan in Annals of Sporting (Vol. 1.), 1822, refer to the result of these crossings for the first time as Bull Terriers”. Later in 1829, Captain Thomas Brown in his Biographical Sketches and Authentic Anecdotes of Dogs, devoted a special chapter to this “new” breed, the Bull Terrier. The terrier role in this Bulldog-Terrier alliance is believed to have been performed by the Old English Black-and-Tan Terrier, forerunner of the Manchester Terrier. It is not surprising that size in these old Bull-and-Terriers varied considerably. Some taking after their Bulldog progenitor went 60 lbs. Read more […]

The Lens and Vitreous

The lens develops rapidly in the early stages of embryogenesis, during which time it is nourished by the hyaloid vessel. The fully developed lens is avascular; by the second week of life, no remnants of the hyaloid system should remain. The normal lens often exhibits minor imperfections that can be easily detected with magnification in dogs and cats younger than 1 year. These include prominent anterior and posterior Y sutures and minute granules in its nucleus and cortex. A mosaic of brown pigment spots is occasionally seen on the anterior lens capsule near the center of the pupil, representing remnants of embryonic mesoderm. Disease of the vitreous would be expected to influence the lens or retina because of its attachments at the posterior lens surface and the optic disc. Congenital Abnormalities Congenital lens abnormalities include alterations in size or shape. Congenital absence of the lens (aphakia) is uncommon. In microphakia, the margin of the abnormally small lens along with elongated ciliary processes may be observed after pupillary dilation. Microphakia occurs along with other ocular defects in the Saint Bernard and beagle and in cats. Luxation of the microphakic lens may cause glaucoma. Lenticonus is a Read more […]

The faults and defects of the breeds: Terriers

Airedale Terriers Hip dysplasia; Trembling hindquarters seen after six months of age; Thyroid disorders American Staffordshire Terriers Ruptured curciate ligament (very common) Australian Terriers Legg-Calves Perthes disease; Patella luxation Border Terriers Patella luxation; Hip dysplasia Bull Terriers None recorded in veterinary literature Cairn Terriers Patella luxation; Legg-Calves Perthes disease Dandie Dinmont Terriers IVD (intervertebrate disk disease); Achondroplasia; Patella luxation, either medial or lateral; Hip dysplasia; Shoulder luxation; Elbow dysplasia; Neoplasias Fox Terriers (Smooth and Wire) Shoulder dislocation; Legg Calves Perthes disease; Myasthenia gravis Irish Terriers Muscular dystrophy Kerry Blue Terriers UAP (ununited anconeal process) Lakeland Terriers UAP (ununited anconeal process); Legg-Calves Perthes disease; Manchester Terriers (Standard and Toy) Legg-Calves Perthes disease Miniature Schnauzers Legg-Calves Perthes disease; Muscular dystrophy Scottish Terriers Dwarfism; Scoottie cramp, characterized by rigidity of limbs with dog recovering in 30 seconds; Thyroid disorders; Elbow dysplasia; IVD (intervertebrate disk disease) Sealyham Terriers IVD (intervertebrate Read more […]