Tag Archives: Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

Diarrhoea in Dogs

Diarrhoea in dogs have been mentioned in 1824 Looseness, or Purging (Diarrhoea). Dogs are very subject, under various circumstances, to diarrhoea. It is seldom that they are affected with the Distemper without having a morbid alvine flux also, and which, when obstinate and violent, is one of the most fatal accompaniments the disease can have. In the distemper, the colour and consistence of the loose stools vary much; sometimes the motions are glairy or mucus-like, often frothy and pale; at others totally black: but, when the purging has lasted some time, they invariably become yellow. Another common cause of purging among dogs arises from worms; in which cases, the stools are less liquid, but more glairy and frothy: the state of the bowels varies also from day to day, being at one time loose, and at another costive. When diarrhoea continues for many days, the rectum becomes inflamed and slightly ulcerated within the fundament, by which a constant irritation and tenesmus are kept up; and the poor animal, feeling as though he wanted to evacuate, is continually trying to bring something away. On observing this, persons are frequently led into error; for, under a supposition that there exists actual costiveness at Read more […]

Congenital and Hereditary Disorders of the Kidney

Structural Anomalies of the Kidney RENAL AGENESIS Renal agenesis is the complete absence of one or both kidneys. Bilateral renal agenesis is fatal and is a cause of early death in puppies and kittens (). Unilateral renal agenesis is more frequendy observed in puppies and kittens than is bilateral agenesis (). Unilateral renal agenesis may affect either kidney and is usually accompanied by ipsilateral ureteral agenesis. The etiopathogenesis of renal agenesis in dogs and cats is uncertain. A familial predisposition for renal agenesis in beagles, Shetland sheepdogs, and Doberman pinschers supports a genetic basis for the anomaly (Table 17-1). Unilateral renal agenesis may remain clinically silent, provided the contralateral kidney undergoes sufficient compensatory change to maintain normal hemostasis. Clinical findings may include an inability to palpate both kidneys or to detect a kidney by ultrasonography or contrast urography. Because of close associations in the development of the urogenital system, findings of abnormal or absent vas deferens, epididymal tails, or uterine horns at the time of castration or ovariohysterectomy should arouse suspicion of concurrent unilateral renal agenesis. Because unilateral renal Read more […]