Tag Archives: Lhasa Apsos

The Eye

The Ophthalmic Examination History A complete ophthalmic history is an essential part of every puppy’s or kitten’s examination. Owners may be asked questions regarding the animal’s signalment, history of the presenting complaint(s), and any pertinent medical or ophthalmic diseases in the animal’s family histories. Other historical information that may be included is the animal’s vaccination status, diet, environment, and exposure to other animals. Previous therapy should be identified to prevent repetition of an unsuccessful regimen. Procedure Ophthalmic examination should be performed in a quiet area. Puppies usually require only gentle but firm restraint of the head. Very young puppies cooperate nicely when held in an assistant’s arms. Kittens can also be gently restrained and are less likely to demonstrate the constant ocular motion typical of puppies. Uncooperative puppies or kittens may be placed in a towel or restraint bag. Assessment of ocular abnormalities such as orbital swelling, squinting, or ocular discharge can be done in a well-lighted room, but actual ophthalmoscopic examination should be done with the lights dimmed. A bright source of focal illumination is required; the Finoff transilluminator on Read more […]

Canine Kidney Diseases

Diseases Of Different Organs Canine kidney diseases can occur for a variety of reasons, including the presence of tumours in the body, heart failure, bladder stones, or shock following a severe accident. Dr Bush explains how the kidneys work, how they can be affected by disease, and discusses the treatments available to dogs. Understanding the nature of kidney diseases in the dog requires first of all a little knowledge of how the kidneys function. Normal kidneys perform a number of important tasks, espeially, 1) Removing from the body the waste products of metabolic processes (excretion), particularly those resulting from the breakdown of proteins such as urea. 2) regulating the amounts of “salts”, for example, electrolytes such as sodium and potassium, and water in the body. If there is an excess of any of these, the surplus is excreted; if in short supply, excretion is reduced as far as possible so that the substance is conserved. This excretion of substances is achieved by producing urine, the composition of which can be varied. In addition, although not germane to a general consideration of renal disease, the kidneys also control the degree of acidity or alkalinity within the body, secrete hormones affecting blood Read more […]

The faults and defects of the breeds: Non-Sporting Dogs

American Eskimo Dogs Hip dysplasia Bichons Frises Patella luxation Boston Terriers Neoplasias; Patella luxation, either medial or lateral; Swimmers syndrome, the inability to stand at four to six weeks; Vertebral abnormalities Bulldogs Spina bifida, caused by ununited neural arches; Neoplausa; Swimmers syndrome, the inability to stand at four to six weeks; Hip dysplasia; Elbow dysplasia; Flaccid shoulder joints; Thyroid disorders; Vertebral abnormalites Chinese Shar-Peis Patella luxation; Hip dysplasia; Elbow dysplasia; Swollen hock syndrome Chow Chows Hip dysplasia; Elbow dysplasia Dalmatians Muscular dystrophy Finnish Spitz Patella luxation French Bulldogs Hemivertebrae, which is the asymmetric abnormal development of vertebrae, resulting in scoliosis and crowding of one half of the body, producing a wedge-shape. It often results in neonatal death or spinal cord compression in older puppies. Keeshonds Thyroid and other endocrine disorders, primary hyperparathyroidism in older dogs; Patella luxation; Hip dysplasia; Neoplasias Lhasa Apsos Patella luxation, either medial or lateral; Hip dysplasia Poodles (Miniature) Dwarfism; Hypoplasia of dens; Atypical pannus; Patella luxation; Shoulder luxation; Read more […]

Anatomy Of The Dog: What is a Breed

A few months ago, the United Kennel Club added nine breeds, to its registry, bringing its total to 160. Last month, the American Kennel Club announced the addition of the American Kennel Club announced the addition of the American Eskimo to its miscellaneous group, the first step towards official recognition as an AKC breed. The new UKC breeds are Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen, Canaan Dog, English Toy Spaniel, Finnish Spitz, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Manchester Terrier, Polish Owczarek Nizinny, Tibetan Spaniel and Shiba, all but the Nizziny are recognized by the AKC, some of them for many years, and AKC’s newest, the American Eskimo, has been a UKC breed for a long time. Both registries seem to be in race to add new breeds to their lists, a race that some critics say is an effort to increase the treasuries of both organizations. This rush, along with the apparent whimsical assignment of breed status in some cases, an increase in breed-specific laws in the last few years, and the call by animal rights advocates for a ban on breeding pure bred dogs, has caused some to wonder about the definition of breed. So what is a breed? Webster’s Desk Dictionary of the English Language defines a breed as “a homogeneous grouping Read more […]