Tag Archives: Bedlington Terriers

Zinc Acetate, Zinc Sulfate

NUTRITIONAL; TRACE ELEMENT Highlights of Prescribing Information Metal nutritional agent that may be used for zinc deficiency, to reduce copper toxicity in susceptible dog breeds (Bedlington Terriers, West Highland White Terriers) with hepatic copper toxicosis, & treat hepatic fibrosis in dogs. Has astringent & antiseptic activity topically. Contraindications: None; consider obtaining zinc & copper levels before treating. Adverse Effects: Large doses may cause GI disturbances or hematologic abnormalities (usually hemolysis), particularly if a coexistent copper deficiency exists Zinc overdoses (e.g., U.S. Pennies) can be serious What Is Drug Used For? Zinc sulfate is used systemically as a nutritional supplement in a variety of species. Oral zinc acetate has been shown to reduce copper toxicity in susceptible dog breeds (Bedlington Terriers, West Highland White Terriers) with hepatic copper toxicosis. Zinc therapy may also be of benefit in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis in the dog. Zinc sulfate is used topically as an astringent and as a weak antiseptic both for dermatologic and ophthalmic conditions. Pharmacology / Actions Zinc is a necessary nutritional supplement; it is required by Read more […]

The Lens and Vitreous

The lens develops rapidly in the early stages of embryogenesis, during which time it is nourished by the hyaloid vessel. The fully developed lens is avascular; by the second week of life, no remnants of the hyaloid system should remain. The normal lens often exhibits minor imperfections that can be easily detected with magnification in dogs and cats younger than 1 year. These include prominent anterior and posterior Y sutures and minute granules in its nucleus and cortex. A mosaic of brown pigment spots is occasionally seen on the anterior lens capsule near the center of the pupil, representing remnants of embryonic mesoderm. Disease of the vitreous would be expected to influence the lens or retina because of its attachments at the posterior lens surface and the optic disc. Congenital Abnormalities Congenital lens abnormalities include alterations in size or shape. Congenital absence of the lens (aphakia) is uncommon. In microphakia, the margin of the abnormally small lens along with elongated ciliary processes may be observed after pupillary dilation. Microphakia occurs along with other ocular defects in the Saint Bernard and beagle and in cats. Luxation of the microphakic lens may cause glaucoma. Lenticonus is a Read more […]

Minerals

Minerals are present in small amounts in the tissues of all living things. Teeth, bones, muscles, and nerves have especially high mineral content. Although the AAFCO provides guidelines for the minimum amounts of minerals necessary for canine growth and development, each dog’s mineral requirements depend on the current nutritional state. For example, if a dog is iron deficient, he will need and absorb more iron from the intestinal tract. Working dogs and ill or stressed dogs may also have higher requirements. Minerals can be divided into two groups: major minerals and trace minerals. The major minerals are required in gram amounts each day, whereas the trace minerals are required in milligram or microgram amounts per day. Of the trace minerals, several are known to be required for canine health, and the roles of others are less understood. Your dog’s body needs to maintain a delicate balance between the various major and trace minerals. For several trace minerals, the line between the required amount and toxic levels is a thin one. So supplementing an already balanced dog food with minerals can create more problems than it solves. Table Sources of Minerals lists the different minerals your dog needs and which foods Read more […]

Copper Toxicosis. Dehydration. Dysphagia

Disease of Alimentary System Copper Toxicosis Like most metals, copper is toxic, but in normal circumstances poisoning is rare. However, some Bedlington Terriers may inherit an inability to eliminate copper via the liver. Consequently levels of copper in the blood stream rise steadily until signs of toxicity are evident. The disease may be accompanied by depression, lethargy, loss of appetite and vomiting; diagnosis can only be confirmed with blood tests. Hepatitis (inflammation) and cirrhosis (fibrosis) of the liver follow. Treatment consists of restricting copper intake: most proprietary foods have relatively modest levels of copper and are a more reliable way of controlling copper intake than made-up diets. Dehydration Deprived of water a dog becomes dehydrated. Water is constantly being lost from the body via saliva, urine, feces, and by way of the expelled breath. In spite of a widely held belief, dogs also lose fluid through their skin, although their ability to sweat is limited. Dogs can survive for quite long periods without solid food, but only for a short while without water. Drinking water should always be readily available, unless veterinary advice has been given to withhold it. It should be clean and reasonably Read more […]