Tag Archives: Australian Shepherds

Velban (Vinblastine) for Injection

ANTINEOPLASTIC Highlights of Prescribing Information A Vinca alkaloid antineoplastic used for a variety of tumors in dogs (& sometimes cats) Contraindications: Preexisting leukopenia or granulocytopenia (unless a result of the disease being treated) or active bacterial infection; reduce dose if hepatic disease Adverse Effects: Gastroenterocolitis (nausea/vomiting), myelosuppression (more so than with vincristine); may also cause constipation, alopecia, stomatitis, ileus, inappropriate ADH secretion, jaw & muscle pain, & loss of deep tendon reflexes CATS can develop neurotoxicity causing constipation or paralytic ileus & aggravating anorexia; can also develop reversible axon swelling & paranodal demyelination Potentially teratogenic Avoid extravasation; wear gloves & protective clothing when preparing or administering Drug Interactions What Is Drug Used For? Vinblastine may be employed in the treatment of lymphomas, carcinomas, mastocytomas, and splenic tumors in small animals. It is more effective than vincristine in the treatment of canine mast cell tumors. Pharmacology / Actions Vinblastine apparently binds to microtubular proteins (tubulin) in the mitotic spindle, thereby Read more […]

The Lens and Vitreous

The lens develops rapidly in the early stages of embryogenesis, during which time it is nourished by the hyaloid vessel. The fully developed lens is avascular; by the second week of life, no remnants of the hyaloid system should remain. The normal lens often exhibits minor imperfections that can be easily detected with magnification in dogs and cats younger than 1 year. These include prominent anterior and posterior Y sutures and minute granules in its nucleus and cortex. A mosaic of brown pigment spots is occasionally seen on the anterior lens capsule near the center of the pupil, representing remnants of embryonic mesoderm. Disease of the vitreous would be expected to influence the lens or retina because of its attachments at the posterior lens surface and the optic disc. Congenital Abnormalities Congenital lens abnormalities include alterations in size or shape. Congenital absence of the lens (aphakia) is uncommon. In microphakia, the margin of the abnormally small lens along with elongated ciliary processes may be observed after pupillary dilation. Microphakia occurs along with other ocular defects in the Saint Bernard and beagle and in cats. Luxation of the microphakic lens may cause glaucoma. Lenticonus is a Read more […]

The Retina and Optic Nerve

Tapetal coloration of the fundus of the puppy and kitten is usually gray or blue at 6 to 8 weeks of age, gradually acquiring its adult coloration by 4 to 7 months of age when the tapetum matures. Myelination of the optic disc may also be incomplete in the puppy and kitten, giving the impression of a small, well-defined nerve head that takes on a more fluffy appearance as adult myelination occurs.Both congenital and acquired disorders of the retina and optic nerve are recognized in the young dog and cat. These may be inherited, as with collie eye anomaly, or secondary to postnatal influences, as occurs with canine distemper-induced retinitis. Congenital abnormalities can be diagnosed as early as 6 weeks of age, when the posterior segment is clearly observed. The more common congenital abnormalities of the canine fundus are summarized in Table Congenital Abnormalities of the Canine Fundus. Acquired abnormalities develop with advancing age and in this discussion are limited to those in dogs and cats younger than 6 months of age. Table Congenital Abnormalities of the Canine Fundus (diagnosed as early as 6-8 wk of age). DISORDER BREED CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES Collie eye anomaly Collie, Shetland sheepdog, Read more […]

Activities

Swimming Swimming is a great way for dogs to get their exercise. It is a low-impact form of exercise that doesn’t tax any joints, but builds muscles. Dogs that are prone to gaining weight can swim to remain in shape and cut pounds from their frames. Good health can be maintained while the dog is having fun. Swimming is also a great way to safely exercise your dog in the summer heat. She can exercise and keep her body temperature down at the same time. Equipment for swimming can be minimal, yet there are certain things to have with you to provide a safe swimming experience for you and your pet. A long leash helps your dog learn to return to your side and gives you some control over where she’s swimming. Wear water shoes of some sort. You should be prepared to go in the water to teach your dog to swim, and you should always be prepared to jump in — even with a seasoned swimmer, just in case something happens. Having a toy to retrieve is helpful once the dog has learned to swim. Not all dogs (even sporting breeds) know how to swim right away, so do not throw your dog into the water in the hopes of his learning quickly. This will only scare him and perhaps cause panic and an accident. Do not make this new learning Read more […]

The faults and defects of the breeds: Herding Dogs

Australian Cattle Dogs OCD (osteochondrities dissecans) of the hock Australian Shepherds Hip dysplasia; Dwarfism; Spina bifida Bearded Collies Hip dysplasia Belgian Malinois Hip dysplasia Belgian Sheepdogs Hip dysplasia; Neoplaisa Belgian Tervurens Hip dysplasia; Thyroid disorders Border Collies OCD (osteochondrities dissecans); Hip dysplasia Bouviers des Flandres Elbow dysplasia; Hip dysplasia Briards Thyroid disorders; Hip dysplasia Cardigan Welsh Corgis Medial patella luxation Collies (Rough and Smooth) Dwarfism; Neoplasias German Shepherd Dogs Dwarfism; Panosteitis, shown as limb pain and intermittent lameness between the ages of 6 and 12 monts; Hip dysplasia; UAP (ununited anconeal process); Cartilagenous Exostosis; Pannus; Elbow dysplasia; Neoplasias; Thyroid disorders; OCD (osteochondrities dissecans); Degenerative myelopathy causes progressive hind limb paralysis in middle age to older dogs. Old English Sheepdogs Hip dysplasia; Wobblers syndrome Pembroke Welsh Corgis IVD (intervertebrate disk disease); Hip dysplasia; Swimmers syndrome Pulik Hip dysplasia Shetland Sheepdogs Hip dysplasia; Dwarfism; Thyroid disorders; Neoplasias; Muscular dystrophy Read more […]