Tag Archives: American Pit Bull Terrier

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

History and Development The Staffordshire Bull Terrier, as his name implies, was produced from a Bulldog with one or more of the terrier breeds which abounded in the early 1800’s. His main progenitor was the Old English Bulldog of about 1820, when the initial crossings were made. This was a rangier, lighter Bulldog than our modem version – in fact, sonic students of canine racism aver that the Stafford is actually a fined-down type of pure Bulldog, selectively bred on terrier-like lines with no true terrier infusion. Quite apart from the name “Bull-and-Terrier” used freely in literature for many decades, respected authors like Pierce Egan in Annals of Sporting (Vol. 1.), 1822, refer to the result of these crossings for the first time as Bull Terriers”. Later in 1829, Captain Thomas Brown in his Biographical Sketches and Authentic Anecdotes of Dogs, devoted a special chapter to this “new” breed, the Bull Terrier. The terrier role in this Bulldog-Terrier alliance is believed to have been performed by the Old English Black-and-Tan Terrier, forerunner of the Manchester Terrier. It is not surprising that size in these old Bull-and-Terriers varied considerably. Some taking after their Bulldog progenitor went 60 lbs. Read more […]

Intention tremors due to cerebellar disorders

Tremors that occur when an animal intends to move in a goal-orientated activity are most often the result of cerebellar disease (). Degenerative diseases Cerebellar cortical degeneration Cerebellar cortical degeneration, also termed cerebellar abiotrophy, is usually an inherited disease in dogs () with few reports in cats. Primary cerebellar cortical degeneration refers to degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells, molecular cells and granule cells. Clinical signs: These diseases are recognized syndromes in American Staffordshire Terriers, American Pit Bull Terriers, Kerry Blue Terriers, Gordon Setters, Rough-coated Collies, Border Collies, Brittany Spaniels, Bullmastiffs, Old English Sheepdogs and occur rarely in Samoyeds, Airedales, Finnish Harriers, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, Cairn Terriers, Great Danes, Scottish Terriers and others (). Clinical signs usually begin between 3 and 12 months of age. However, a subset of adult onset diseases occur with signs starting from 2-8 years of age in the Brittany Spaniel (), Gordon Setter (), Old English Sheepdog (), American Staffordshire Terrier () and Scottish Terrier (). Other signs of cerebellar disease that accompany cerebellar Read more […]